Pizza, Pepperoni and Popsicles – Art about Food

Oh my gosh, camp was fun today.  It was a small group of only 3 kids as several campers had to cancel due to the darn stomach bug. We started off on the computer looking at a variety of art about and with food.  First, traditional still life paintings that included food intheir arrangement. Then we moved on to the artist Giuseppe Arcimbolda, an Italian painter from the late 1500s who painted portraits made entirely with the images of fruits and vegetables. He was way ahead of his time. Click here to read about him and his art. Then, we looked at the work of Carl Warner, a british photographer, who uses real food to create his landscapes- think a sea of salmon filets, a broccoli tree, mountains of bread.  Click here to see his interesting art. Then we looked at the mini food sculptures of Shay Aaron, most of which is made with polymer clay. You can see it here.

In addition to artists, we talked about how chefs could be artists in their preparation of food. Could the taste of the food they created, in addition to its presentation, be considered art?  I think so. I am all for a broad definition of what constitutes art. I also showed the way that people have made sculptures with food and have made creative presentations of food.  Look here and here for some fun examples.

My original planned projects were making cardboard tube popsicles, a fun, quick project, and Wayne Thiebaud inspired pastel paintings. Both of these could be considered pop-art projects.  Here is a picture of the kids with their popsicles.

Image

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For our Wayne Thiebaud paintings, after looking at his work, the kids each picked up what item they would like to use.  They drew their items in pencil onscrap paper until they were happy with the image.  Then were used graphite paper to transfer their image multiple times onto some nice art paper. They colored their drawings with pastels and we added some highlights and shadows to finish.  I think they turned out great!!  These are two first graders and one second grader!!

My Photo Stream

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Then, since there were only three kids today, I decided to add another purely fun project based on the art of Vik Muniz.  This Brazilian artist is known for making paintings using unusual mediums such as peanut butter and jelly, syrup, chocolate sauce, spaghetti, etc. See some of his work here.  So, the kids and I made art with chocolate magic shell sauce!!! The magic shell  worked really well since it hardened when we took it outside and the kids were able to bring their chocolate art home without making too much of a mess.  Now, next time their parents tell them to stop playing with their food, they can say they are making art.  🙂

chocolate syrup painting 1

chocolate syrup painting 2

 

 

Finally, the one other food artist I showed the kids at the beginning of class was that of  Micheal Breach who makes drawings in the frothed milk of lattes. You can check it out here. When Emma was working on her chocolate/vanilla cardboard popsicle, she discovered that she could simulate the latte and milk in the container that the used to clean her paintbrush.  First, the water became brown like coffee and then she cleaned her brush of the white paint and it swirled around the top. After showing us her container, we all decided to try our hand at simulated latte milk art.  What a hoot! I especially  loved that we could learn about art and add some experimentation and silly projects in the schedule.

coffee art 3

coffee art 2

coffee art 4

Coffee art 1

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: